Friday the 13th

Superstitions from around the office


In honor of Friday The Thirteenth I have been asked to write a post about superstitions.

Superstition is a belief in supernatural causality that one event leads to the cause of another without any process in the physical world linking the two events.

How superstitious is the staff here at Abrams?

I set off to find out (and I will begin by saying that I am very superstitious and not proud of it).

I think my big one is: shoes on a table (a death in the family) but I’m finding that I am, of late, susceptible to the superstitions of others. Now I must wear red underwear on an airplane! (Thanks a lot, Deb.)

I’ve polled others.

Chad Beckerman told me that he must touch, with his right hand, the fuselage of the plane before he flies. He also finds it is back luck to hold a cat upside down, by the tail, under a ladder, upon which a person with a mirror is standing, but that’s the kind of guy Chad is.

 

Chris Blank says: My superstitions mostly reside in sports, or watching sports. I usually wear the same “lucky t-shirt” I have had for years when watching my favorite baseball team, the New York Mets, but I’m starting to feel like it doesn’t work! 

 

Angela Ferguson is all about baseball too: I am a baseball fan so, yes, I have a few superstitions. One is that I have to see Jeter’s first pitch of his at bat or I feel the Yankee’s will lose the game and, of course, I will cross the street to avoid a black cat.

 

Jackie Bondanza told me: I used to be superstitious as a child but then one day, out of sheer rebellion, I dared to open an umbrella in the house. Since then, I’ve enjoyed walking under ladders, seeking out black cats, and breaking mirrors to my heart’s content. I haven’t suffered any of the ominous consequences…yet.

I admire Jackie for this and tried it myself, for a couple of weeks. Then someone put a box of shoes on my dining room table and I panicked a little.

 

Lindy Humphreys has a great story!
I live in Hoboken (supposed birthplace of baseball) and there’s a replication of the Elysian Field baseball diamond at the intersection of 11th and Washington Streets (1st, 2nd, 3rd, Home plates on the sidewalks at each of the four street corners). It’s on my walk home, and if I arrive at the corner with Home plate (NE), I have to step on it. Who knows what will happen if I don’t.

See? I’m with Lindy. There’s no real effort in taking steps to avoid bad luck, right?

 

Merle Browne is Executive Assistant to ABRAMS CEO, Michael Jacobs.

by
on Friday, April 13th, 2012
in Around the Office
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